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PDF and PDF/X Standards Demystified

PDF and PDF/X Standards Demystified

Initially, the concept of PDF/X was intended to facilitate the complete exchange of reliable digital data, particularly in a publications advertising workflow. Complete exchange means the file can be relied upon to be correct without further technical discussion or involvement. PDF/X is not yet another file format—a PDF/X file is a PDF file. More specifically, however, it is a restricted subset of... »

Reduce PDF File Sizes with Image Sampling

Reduce PDF File Sizes with Image Sampling

When creating PDF files, you can choose sampling to average and remove pixels from raster images, resulting in smaller file sizes. For example, if you’ve placed a 300-dpi image into a layout application but scaled it to 50% of the original size, the effective resolution of that image is now 600 dpi, far more than is needed when printing at 150-line screen. Sampling removes these “extra” pixels tha... »

PDF Image Compression Demystified in Adobe Creative Cloud

PDF Image Compression Demystified in Adobe Creative Cloud

Adobe Creative Cloud applications, such as InDesign, Illustrator, and Distiller offer the option of compressing image and text files in PDF documents. With the right settings, compression will reduce file size without sacrificing image quality. If you absolutely wish to avoid any chance of image quality being degraded due to compression, uncheck all of the boxes under the Images tab. The drawback ... »

Overprint Preview in Acrobat

Overprint Preview in Acrobat

PDF files are the most common form of soft proofing in the printing industry. You’ll want to be sure that you (and your customers!) are viewing color as accurately as possible when approving PDFs for print production. This means making sure the color is accurate and that you’re viewing exactly how inks (and objects!) will overprint when the ink hits the paper. Acrobat and Reader both have an Overp... »